3 Things You Can Gain From Using Mobile Marketing Software

Companies in a wide variety of industries utilize field marketing tactics to further grow their businesses. Having a means of tracking the effectiveness of these efforts is crucial to the health of a brand’s overall marketing strategy. Here are three hyper-relevant insights that managers can gain after collecting data with a mobile marketing software solution.

Sales Territory Efficiency

Perhaps your organization employs field merchandising representatives or street teams to promote your product/service at offsite locations. Sales territories, or the geographical location that a particular field representative is responsible for covering, are often arbitrarily established by managers in an effort to streamline operations. However, inefficient or nonexistent territories can ultimately harm relationships with clients and the bottom line. For example, disorganized territory management might force multiple employees to handle the same client or cause a client to be neglected altogether. Moreover, animosity could develop within teams as they argue over who is liable for various clients.

To combat this, managers should take advantage of a software tool that is able to track how much time employees spend with a given client, the geographical location that employees cover in a given day, and the types of activities employees are executing at client visits. Having a historical record of this information will enable managers to design territories that are appropriate for each employee or team based on how long they are spending with clients, the nature of the work that is being performed, and what other locations those employees are visiting throughout the day.

Client Value

Another insight that can be realized with mobile marketing software is how much value individual clients are contributing to an organization. As described above, some software solutions have the ability to amass data on what activities are being accomplished when employees are on-site. For instance, employees might be doing a number of things such as taking replenishment orders, documenting the appearance of promotional materials, or taking notes on clients’ specific requests.

Data collection tools are able to reveal which clients are responsible for the highest number of revenue-generating activities. Knowing this information might lead managers to supply employees with additional resources so as to maintain the strongest possible relationship with these clients.

Promotional Success

A large part of many companies’ field marketing programs is on-site promotions/demonstrations. Lots of work goes into making promotions happen, yet too often companies don’t have a standardized process for measuring the success of these events. This is problematic because it’s impossible to make the necessary improvements to promotions without a record of how they performed.

One solution for this issue is to use digital forms. Some mobile marketing tools are equipped with customizable digital forms that managers can design for the specific use of collecting relevant data before, during, and after a promotional event. Information that employees should gather includes how much product was sold, a photo of the display set-up, how many potential customers interacted with the brand, how many samples were given away, among a number of other data points.

Mobile marketing software is an essential partner in the field for any team that conducts marketing and sales activities outside of the office. What’s more, managers owners reap its benefits by having instant access to key data that enables them to make informed business decisions faster than ever before.

Top Mobile Marketing Tips From The Experts

As the use mobile devices continues to increase at a dramatic rate, a well-defined mobile marketing strategy in 2015 is essential for any business. Business Sense speaks to mobile experts for their tips on making the most of mobile.

In a Nutshell


• Responsive websites crucial since Google mobile search update
• App-based advertising is more important as content tastes change
• Video advertising on mobiles and tablets is the new growth area

In 2014, online shopping via mobile overtook desktop for the first time. The IMRG Capgemini Quarterly Benchmarking Report found 52% of visits to retail websites came from mobiles with 36% of online sales in the UK made via a smartphone or tablet.

But it’s not just important for retailers. Businesses of all types, shapes and sizes must ride the wave of increased mobile and tablet usage that has come from cheaper devices, faster 4G networks and wider rollouts of wireless internet – even on the London Underground.

Ofcom has revealed access to the internet using a mobile phones alone doubled between 2010 and 2014 – soaring from 24% to 58%.

And research by agency We Are Social discovered that in January 2015, 27% of the total number of web pages served in the UK were accessed by mobiles.

Mobile is changing the way we consume content

Hari Mann, a lecturer at Ashridge Business School, says: “The strategic shift to mobile is a fundamental, irrevocable shift that is occurring for businesses.

Mobile marketing needs to be at the heart of the business. It has to be integrated at the start, seamless with other campaigns, and most importantly it needs to be relevant to the consumer and their needs. People won’t come back to a page on their phones or tablets if it doesn’t work or load properly.”

In April this year, Google moved to make mobile more important than ever. A major update to its algorithms meant having a mobile-friendly – or so-called ‘responsive’ website became crucial – not least given that in February 2014, Google’s share of mobile search was a whopping 94.55%.

Responsive websites see their pages adapt to the screen size they are viewed on, without having to tap, zoom or scroll horizontally.

Now these optimised pages will rank higher in Google’s mobile search results than those that haven’t been made responsive so it’s no wonder professional collaboration website Upwork has seen a 102% rise in the amount of money businesses have spent on hiring responsive design skills in January to March 2015.

Responsive websites are crucial not simply a preference

Faye O’Donohue-Hill, of designers OH Creative, has seen a surge in requests for mobile responsive website builds. She says: “If you want to discover whether your site is mobile friendly or not, you can take the Google test.

“Your digital presence gives an important indicator to the outside world of the kind of business you run. Without a fully responsive website it could look as though you are indifferent to the needs of your visitors.

“You don’t want to be losing business to the competition because they can’t access something as simple as your contact details, opening times or other important information.”

Responsive websites are crucial but they are only one part of the mobile strategy.

Mobile advertising on the up

The Institute of Advertising Bureau’s 2014 Digital Adspend report saw a 63% year-on-year growth in mobile advertising, up to 23%.

Jon Myers, MD EMEA at Marin Software, says: “For the brand advertiser, it makes sense to allocate more spend toward mobile ads on social and display networks, which are strong on branded advertising and consumer usage. Marketers should also look into tracking mobile ad formats like click-to-call and store-locator.

“Mobile apps now account for almost 90% of all time spent on mobile devices, so this makes mobile app advertising an important tool in any marketer’s toolbox. This is especially true for social media, as Facebook is the most-used app on smartphones and tablets. According to Gartner, by 2017 mobile apps will generate $77 billion in revenue worldwide, so marketers must be attuned to this area to create well balanced campaigns.”

He adds: “Plan ahead for mobile video advertising. Mobile video is quickly becoming another important channel for marketers to reach advertisers, and must be paid attention to in the future.”

Apps having a massively growing appeal

The growth in apps is not simply about building an app-based version of your website. Weaving in popular mobile functions such as location tracking, Bluetooth and Near Field Communication (NFC) payment is now a daily user expectation.

Diana Marian, of Ampersand Mobile, explains: “Few marketers understand that a mobile user is a particular kind of creature: they only allow meaningful communications through on the most private device they own.

“They respond to marketing messaging only if delivered within context and with their permission. Their attention span is short. Their battery life is precious. They want things to be quick, simple, relevant and elegant. One tap or one scroll: this is what mobility really means to them.”

Andy Atalla, founder of Digital marketing agency atom42, explains the importance of apps saying: “Mobile is fast becoming the best way to reach customers. We are past the mobile tipping point and information is consumed more and more through mobile, with the average user interacting with their mobile device 150 times a day.

“We also know that there’s a clear consumer preference for apps vs mobile sites, with 80% of mobile time spent in app rather than in browser.

Whatever choice you make, it is clear experts believe mobile is the fastest changing and biggest growth area in the marketing strategy. It’s certainly not a business move that can ever be ignored or delayed.

Five Tips for Better Text-Message Marketing

1. Be brief and focused.
Your text message should be laser focused and succinct. There’s no room for fluff in mobile marketing. Know who your target audience is and speak directly to it. Leave out extraneous details and simply describe how to take advantage of your offer and its benefits.

2. Avoid hype, slang and abbreviations.
If your text message looks like spam, consumers will delete it without a second thought. It’s critical that you leave out anything that might seem too slick and promotional. That includes marketing hype like “amazing” offers, slang and text abbreviations, all of which cheapen the perception of your brand and can destroy your campaign.

3. Offer something of immediate value.

No one wants to receive texts from a company unless the messages offer something of immediate value. Because text messaging is an instantaneous medium, you should include real-time offers. Whether you’re providing information about a sale or a new product, the message should describe the benefits of acting now.

4. Identify yourself.
How often have you received a text that doesn’t identify the company or brand? Instead, you often see a phone number you don’t recognize and a vague message that could have come from any number of companies. And how often have you simply deleted those anonymous messages? It’s essential that you clearly identify your business or brand to avoid getting the spam treatment.

5. Make consumers feel special.
Don’t clutter consumers’ text message inboxes with offers and news they could easily get from your website or your brick-and-mortar locations. Instead, make recipients of your texts feel they’re special and have qualified for an exclusive promotion. Otherwise, they will most likely opt out of receiving any future texts from you.

Email Marketing Must Be Reimagined

Email is here to stay – in fact our latest study shows over half (51%) of UK office workers expect email usage to increase over the next two years . Mobile devices are encouraging the majority of us to obsessively check our inbox around the clock, and a massive 81% of us check email outside of working hours. A third (31%) of people even admit to checking their messages while still in bed in the morning – a figure which jumps to 50% for those aged 18-24.

Our continued addiction to email, particularly by millennials, means nearly two thirds (63%) of consumers still prefer to receive marketing offers in this way, way ahead of direct mail (20%), social media channels (6%), the brand’s mobile app (5%), text message (4%) and phone (2%). Email is more relevant than ever before, and marketers cannot afford to let promotional messages go stale.

So why then are the majority of email offers sent by brands left unopened? Consumers are clearly not being wowed and are left frustrated by brands that have not yet broken away from the days of blast-style emails. People want to see fewer emails (35%) and less repetition of the same messages (34%), while those checking email on their smartphone are turned off by having to scroll too much to read an entire email (28%), the layout not being optimised for mobile (21%), and having to wait for images to load (21%).

One thing which hasn’t changed, however, is our appetite for offers and vouchers. Two thirds (67%) of people said they would be more likely to open a marketing email if the subject line made it clear there was an offer or voucher, with women aged 18-34 the savviest shoppers.

Email Marketing: Old dog, new tricks

Email has been a mainstay of office culture for more than 30 years now so, of all the marketing disciplines, this is often the one in desperate need of reinvention. Brands must learn to do new things with the old technology – like geo-targeting, video and buy buttons – and adapt to constantly evolving email habits. Only in the past couple of years, for example, we’ve seen an explosion in the use of emoji with nearly a third (30%) of UK office workers using the pictures or facial expressions not just with their friends but in emails to their boss. As informality has crept into the workplace, four in ten (39%) people will use also emoji when emailing a direct manager and 59% when emailing peers.

We have also seen a growing trend for email detoxes, with 35% of people now saying they have some self-imposed time out. The average detox lasted 5.5 days and respondents reported feeling “Liberated” (33%) or “Relaxed” (44%).

Detoxes aside, email marketers have an undeniably devoted audience. The priority must be to keep consumers engaged through more dynamic content that reaches the right person, with the right content, at the right place and at just the right moment. Email has stood the test of time, and brands need to make sure their messages keep the same relevance.

In B2B Marketing, Don’t Forget the Basics

Marketing professionals, particularly those who work with technology companies, strive to stay ahead of the curve. What’s the next new tactic, channel or trend we need to have on our radar?

Social media and content marketing are now mainstream. Even mobile marketing is losing its shiny newness. Which technologies do we need to watch next, to understand their impact on marketing strategies and tactics—”big data” analytics? Wearables? The Internet of Things? Micropersonalization?

It’s not just a matter of being distracted by shiny new things. It really is important to watch trends and understand the business impact of new technologies (case in point: Blockbuster).

But lead generation remains the top priority for B2B marketers, and when it comes down to what pays the bills, it’s imperative not to lose sight of the basics, of what works. And even in a hyper-connected app-driven world, old-school techniques like live events, direct mail, and email still rule.

Consider recent research from Chief Marketer (see below). Other than social media and content marketing (no surprise), the top three sources for B2B lead generation are email (87%), trade shows & conferences (62%), and direct mail (49%).

The Chief Marketer report also notes that, other than referrals, the tactics that produce the largest number of qualified leads are face-to-face sales interaction (such as at trade shows and conferences), email, and direct marketing.

And among other recent research findings reported here, “Despite all the hype about online, 67% of B2B content marketers consider event marketing to be their most effective strategy,” and “The vast majority of buyers prefer to contact vendors through email (81%) or phone (58%). Just 17% want to use live chat and 9% social media.”

Though best practices for using these channels continue to evolve, the tactics themselves are decidedly old-school.Industrial trade shows date to the late 18th century, and direct mail originated even earlier, with William Lucas’s seed cataloguein 1667.

Even email has reached middle age. As shown in the infographic below:

  • • The first electronic message was sent 44 years ago, in 1971.
  • • The term “email” was first used in 1982.
  • • The word “spam” (pertaining to email) was added to the Oxford Dictionary in 1998.
  • • And by 2012, 90 million Americans were accessing email on mobile devices—64% of them daily.

The challenge for B2B marketers is to continue to embrace and experiment with new technologies and tactics, while not neglecting proven techniques.